Red, White, and Blue Coming Together is an initiative to
unite

America

behind a common vision for our role in the world. After a bitter election
season, which focused attention on the divisions between “Red” and “Blue”
America, this event series will seek to begin the healing process both by
raising awareness about the hidden consensus that already exists in key policy
areas of foreign policy, as well as by facilitating constructive, non-partisan
dialogue on more controversial issues. Red, White, and Blue Coming Together
will be launched as part of AID’s New Year’s Resolution for

America

, which aims to unite

America

’s many
political colors in 2005 in their ongoing struggle to build a “more perfect
union.”  If you would like to organize an event as part of this series, see http://www.aidemocracy.org/toolkit.pdf .

The first half of the series, which will take place in
January and February 2005 to coincide with the presidential inauguration, will
feature a series of town hall events to bring attention to the “hidden
consensus” that already exists for principled U.S. leadership in the world,
based on surveys indicating that overwhelming majorities of Americans support
increased funding to combat AIDS in Africa and greater humanitarian assistance
to expand access to education in developing countries. In light of such accord,
Red, White and Blue Coming Together will feature a series of events focused on
the broad question “What are

America

’s
obligations to the developing world? And what are developing countries
obligations to

America

?”
with an aim towards bringing public attention to the "hidden
consensus" around these issues. In this framework, AID will undertake a
series of follow-up steps to ensure that the

U.S.

fully funds the Millennium
Development Goals, building accountability networks that can meet regularly
with local government representatives to ensure that policymakers act on this
existing public consensus.

After highlighting areas of consensus in the first half of
Red, White and Blue Coming Together, the second half of this initiative—which
will take place in March and April to coincide with the second anniversary of
the Iraq war—will feature a series of “common ground” events. The “common ground” town halls will take a
closer look at the issues where public opinion seems sharply divided, but where
common ground may still exist. These events will analyze the questions: “Can
the U.N. be reformed to suit

U.S.

and world interests? What are the prospects for reform?” These town halls will
aim not only to examine concretely where American public opinion differs on the
controversial issue of U.N. reform, but also to identify points of overlap
between the so-called “Red” and “Blue” America. AID will follow this series of
town hall events with follow-up action steps aimed at ensuring that U.S.
citizens’ voices are heard by the UN as it weighs its options for reforming its
own structure—and the international system more broadly—to meet the challenges
of the 21st Century.

At a time when

America

is seen as divided,
Americans for Informed Democracy (AID) hopes to revive our sense of common
purpose. AID believes that the

U.S.

can only develop a sustainable and effective foreign policy if Americans of all
political colors work to understand and respect different viewpoints, actively
searching for common ground. Ultimately, AID hopes that its initiative can act
as a grassroots equivalent to the 9/11 Commission, bringing together Americans
from all perspectives to articulate a constructive, non-partisan series of
recommendations that can renew and sustain American democracy, ensuring
principled

U.S.

leadership in the world.

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